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tongue groove composite wood zoo

Fish fins and mouse feet controlled by the same ancient genetic switch Jul 11, 2011 . Whenever you pick up a book or take a step, you're relying on a genetic legacy that's been handed down since your ancestors swam about in prehistoric oceans. Your hands and feet intricate bundles of bones and muscle are your versions of the fins of fish. They may look very different, but they were..

Leopard seals suck - Not Exactly Rocket Science : Not Exactly . Nov 1, 2012 . t is an awe-inspiring experience to be faced with a 3-metre-long, 500 kilogram predator, the size of a racehorse, as it launches itself out of the water and slides on its belly for a couple of seconds, coming to a halt barely a metre away from where I stood, without any barrier between me and it. That was how..

Under three layers of junk, the secret to a fatal brain disease - Not . Mar 12, 2012 . Writers often compare the human genome to a collection of recipes for making a person. Each gene contains the instructions for building a protein, and our thousands of proteins work together to build and maintain our bodies. But if the genome is a recipe book, it's one that was written without a good editor

What is the point of pruney fingers? - Not Exactly Rocket Science . Jun 28, 2011 . So here is a puzzler. Your mouth is a persistently wet environment, covered in skin. Probably specialized skin, especially on the tongue. So how come it does not pucker? Of course if different skin composition can cause pruney fingers, presumably water resistant skin in the mouth can prevent pruning too

Why are stabby mantis shrimps so much slower than punchy ones . Nov 21, 2012 . If you want to find an ocean animal that kills with speed, don't look to sharks, swordfishes, or barracuda. Instead, try to find a mantis shrimp. These pugilistic relatives of crabs and lobsters attack other animals by rapidly unfurling a pair of arms held under their heads. One group of them he smashers ave..

Infectious bacteria in your gut create black market for weapons - Not . Jan 10, 2012 . PNAS http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1113246109. An introduction to the microbiome. mouse_neurons_gut_bacteria; apes; bacteria-with-guts; genetic-loans; introduction; our-zeroeth-birthday-present; poliovirus_reovirus; the-bacteria-that-make-you-; the-zoo-on-your-skin; your-are-what-you-eat..

Antibiotics fuel obesity by creating microbe upheavals - Not Exactly . Aug 23, 2012 . We aren't single individuals, but colonies of trillions. Our bodies, and our guts in particular, are home to vast swarms of bacteria and other microbes. This icrobiota helps us to harvest energy from our food by breaking down the complex molecules that our own cells cannot cope with. They build vitamins..

Parasitising Grandma - why alien eggs can be a sign of helpful . Jun 29, 2011 . It seemed like such a simple story. Some birds lay their eggs in the nests of other birds of their own species. This practice, known as brood parasitism, foists the burden of parenthood onto other birds, who unwittingly devote their energies to raising someone else's chicks. The exploiter wins; the victim loses

The enemy of my prey's enemy is my friend, or Why parasitic wasps . Aug 14, 2012 . In a British lab, a wasp has become (locally) extinct. And then, another wasp follows it into oblivion. That's odd because these two insects are not competitors. They don't attack one another, and they don't even eat the same food. They do, however, remind us that it's very hard to predict how the decline of..

Infants prefer a nasty moose if it punishes an unhelpful elephant . Nov 28, 2011 . If you saw someone punching a stranger in the street, you might think poorly of them. But if you found out that the stranger had slept with the assailant's partner, had kicked a kitten, or was Justin Bieber, you might think differently about the situation. You might even applaud the punch-thrower. When we..

Virtual resurrection shows that early four-legged animal couldn't . May 23, 2012 . In a small office north of London, Stephanie Pierce from the Royal Veterinary College is watching a movement that hasn't been seen for 360 million years. On her computer, she has resurrected the long-extinct Ichthyostega one of the earliest four-legged animals to creep about on land. By recreating this..

Dinosaurs grew fast, had teen pregnancies and died young - Not . Oct 5, 2010 . Tyrannosaurus This is an old article, reposted from the original WordPress incarnation of Not Exactly Rocket Science. I'm travelling around at the moment so the next few weeks will have some classic pieces and a few new ones I prepared earlier. For some dinosaurs, the best strategy was to grow fast and..

Weapons made from shark teeth are completely badass, and hint at . Aug 13, 2012 . For those of you who are wondering how you weaponise shark teeth, which are already regenerating, serrated meat knives at the business end of a streamlined, electric-sensing torpedo, here's how. You drill a tiny hole in them, and then bind them in long rows to a piece of wood to make a sword

Will we ever. make a safe cigarette? - Not Exactly Rocket Science . Nov 26, 2012 . There's an old saying among people who work in public health: Tobacco is the only legal product that, when used as intended, will kill you. Decades of research have thoroughly documented the health problems that result from inhaling tobacco smoke more than a dozen different types of cancer, heart..

As oxygen filled the world, life's universal clock began to tick - Not . May 16, 2012 . The Earth's earliest days were largely free of oxygen. Then, around 2.5 billion years ago, primitive bacteria started to flood the atmosphere with this vital gas. They produced it in the process of harnessing the sun's energy to make their own nutrients, just as plants do today. The building oxygen levels..

Twitter as a giant global mood ring - Not Exactly Rocket Science . Sep 29, 2011 . Arwen from the Chameleon's Tongue. It's cool that you can see a shift in happy feelings in counties that have their weekend on different days. It's interesting how the night owls have such a strong timeshift in their morning peak too. September 30, 2011 at 1:21 am. Mieke Roth. Really interessing study

Is that a double helix round your neck or are you just pleased to see . Mar 24, 2011 . In which we take a break from our regularly scheduled programming to celebrate a scarf. At first glance, it looks like an ordinary strip of black and grey wool, but if you look down its length, an iconic hidden pattern emerges (see below). Yes, thanks to this present

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